Update and new fish conundrum

The ‘Lamprologus’ caudopunctatus show square tank. Photo by the author.

I haven’t posted in a while about my tanks, my stock, etc. I have nine tanks, five of which are show tanks. The others, all 20g longs, are used for breeding, QT, and other such needs. The show tanks (2 x 75g, 30g, and 33g long) are all in the man cave, except for a 40g breeder I keep in my office. The 20s are all tucked away in my fishroom. 

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Julidochromis dickfeldi  domestic housecleaning

Adult female Julidochromis dickfeldi. Note the rectangular, ceramic tube in the background with most of the opening blocked by the rock (below the cichlid). Photo by the author. 

As a regular breeder of J. dickfeldi, I spend considerable time observing them. Of the many interesting behaviors they exhibit, perhaps one of the most is their propensity for house cleaning.

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New IUCN status

IUCN Logo.

If you’re like me, you like to stay apprised of the conservation status of cichlid species around the world. One of the best ways to do this is to visit the Red List, maintained by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). This list measures the extinction risk of threatened species (both flora and fauna) on our planet. I’ve written a couple of posts about cichlids and the Red List, which you can find here and here. The new status is called the Green Status of Species.

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Julidochromis dickfeldi  brood care

Breeding pair of Julidochromis dickfeldi in a 20g long tank. Note the pair at the entrance to their breeding cave. Photo by the author.

Because I seem to have lots of success breeding Julidochromis dickfeldi, it should come as no surprise that I have a lot to write about them. In a previous post where I described some observations of the species, I indicated that the female was twice the size as the male. I should point out a couple of things about that statement. One, I have not removed any of  my adult pairs to vent them. Two, the species profile on the Cichlid Room Companion states that dickfeldi exhibit sexual dimorphism in size – the male being larger than the female.  Ad Konings’ dickfeldi description in Tanganyika Cichlids in Their Natural Habitat (4th Ed.) does little to shed light on the subject. However, he states that female J. marlieri and J. regani are almost always larger than males, and that female J. ornatus and J. transcriptus may be as well. I can’t say for certain which is typically larger, the male or the female. Nonetheless, males and females in a dickfeldi breeding pair are not the same size.

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The Julidochromis regani nursery

Photo of the “the nursery” in the 75g Tanganyikan community tank. Note the juvenile Julidochromis regani Burundi in the middle of the stack. Photo by the author.

I haven’t posted in a while on my 75g Tanganyikan community tank, so thought I would give an update. The tank currently houses the following:

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