New IUCN status

IUCN Logo.

If you’re like me, you like to stay apprised of the conservation status of cichlid species around the world. One of the best ways to do this is to visit the Red List, maintained by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). This list measure the extinction risk of threatened species (both flora and fauna) on our planet. I’ve written a couple of posts about cichlids and the Red List, which you can find here and here. The new status is called the Green Status of Species.

Continue reading this post…

Julidochromis dickfeldi  brood care

Breeding pair of Julidochromis dickfeldi in a 20g long tank. Note the pair at the entrance to their breeding cave. Photo by the author.

Because I seem to have lots of success breeding Julidochromis dickfeldi, it should come as no surprise that I have a lot to write about them. In a previous post where I described some observations of the species, I indicated that the female was twice the size as the male. I should point out a couple of things about that statement. One, I have not removed any of  my adult pairs to vent them. Two, the species profile on the Cichlid Room Companion states that dickfeldi exhibit sexual dimorphism in size – the male being larger than the female.  Ad Konings’ dickfeldi description in Tanganyika Cichlids in Their Natural Habitat (4th Ed.) does little to shed light on the subject. However, he states that female J. marlieri and J. regani are almost always larger than males, and that female J. ornatus and J. transcriptus may be as well. I can’t say for certain which is typically larger, the male or the female. Nonetheless, males and females in a dickfeldi breeding pair are not the same size.

Continue reading this post…

The Julidochromis regani nursery

Photo of the “the nursery” in the 75g Tanganyikan community tank. Note the juvenile Julidochromis regani Burundi in the middle of the stack. Photo by the author.

I haven’t posted in a while on my 75g Tanganyikan community tank, so thought I would give an update. The tank currently houses the following:

Continue reading this post…

A pugnacious little fish

Throughout my fish keeping journey over the past two decades, I have kept many species of cichlids. We know that every cichlid has its own personality. We also know that the size of the fish is not indicative of its aggression level (e.g., not all big fish are mean and not all little fish are friendly). In fact, some of the nastiest species I’ve kept are dwarf species. 

Continue reading this post…

Should you remove cichlid fry?

33g long aquarium containing Julidochromis dickfeldi and ‘Lamprologus’ ocellatus. Photo by the author.
 
Yes and no. Answers to that question depend on several factors. However, for one example of why you should not allow a breeding pair of cichlids to have multiple broods in the same tank, look no further than Julidochromis dickfeldi. Many species of cichlids can get along just fine with multiple generations of their own offspring, especially shell dwelling species. However, some adult cichlid pairs consider an older brood a threat to the newest brood and will treat the older brood(s) accordingly.

Continue reading this post…