Ben Ochart Interview

Ben Ochart aka: Ben O’Cichlid

If you’re like me, you utilize all resources at your disposal to find information about cichlids. This includes YouTube. In fact, there are numerous YouTube channels dedicated to fish keeping, especially cichlids. I visit several of them regularly.

One day a few weeks ago, while I was looking for some information, I stumbled across a YouTube channel I had not seen before. Intrigued, I decided to check it out. I’m glad I did. The channel is named after the guy who runs it – Ben Ochart, also known as Ben O’Cichlid.

Continue reading this post…

Julidochromis dickfeldi  brood care

Breeding pair of Julidochromis dickfeldi in a 20g long tank. Note the pair at the entrance to their breeding cave. Photo by the author.

Because I seem to have lots of success breeding Julidochromis dickfeldi, it should come as no surprise that I have a lot to write about them. In a previous post where I described some observations of the species, I indicated that the female was twice the size as the male. I should point out a couple of things about that statement. One, I have not removed any of  my adult pairs to vent them. Two, the species profile on the Cichlid Room Companion states that dickfeldi exhibit sexual dimorphism in size – the male being larger than the female.  Ad Konings’ dickfeldi description in Tanganyika Cichlids in Their Natural Habitat (4th Ed.) does little to shed light on the subject. However, he states that female J. marlieri and J. regani are almost always larger than males, and that female J. ornatus and J. transcriptus may be as well. I can’t say for certain which is typically larger, the male or the female. Nonetheless, males and females in a dickfeldi breeding pair are not the same size.

Continue reading this post…

Reducing cross tank contamination

Fish net bucket containing methylene blue. Photo by the author.

During your fish keeping journey, you hopefully won’t have to experience any of the multitude of maladies that affect tropical fresh water fish. Inevitably, however, you will if you’re in this hobby long enough. Furthermore, many pathogens that affect fish are contagious and can spread within your tank and across tanks. Though there are numerous pharmacological options to treat bacterial, viral, and fungal illnesses, that is a post for another day.

Continue reading this post…