Reducing cross tank contamination

Fish net bucket containing methylene blue. Photo by the author.

During your fish keeping journey, you hopefully won’t have to experience any of the multitude of maladies that affect tropical fresh water fish. Inevitably, however, you will if you’re in this hobby long enough. Furthermore, many pathogens that affect fish are contagious and can spread within your tank and across tanks. Though there are numerous pharmacological options to treat bacterial, viral, and fungal illnesses, that is a post for another day.

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Watching cichlids – stress and safety versus visibility

A 40g freshwater tank from 2017. Note the mix of cover and open space. Photo by the author.

Everyone enjoys watching their fish. That’s one reason we keep them. On the other hand, having cichlids visible in your tank because they have little to no cover might be good for you but not always good for them. This is especially true for new fish recently added to a show tank or quarantine tank. 

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Algae and cichlid fry

Rock work with black beard algae (BBA) in Tanganyikan community tank. Photo by the author.

I wanted to follow-up on the previous post, The Julidochromis regani nursery. As you can see in the photo in that post (and above), I have some black beard algae (commonly referred to as BBA) growing on the rock structure. I have posted about this algae and its cousin, blue green algae (BGA), before. 

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The Julidochromis regani nursery

Photo of the “the nursery” in the 75g Tanganyikan community tank. Note the juvenile Julidochromis regani Burundi in the middle of the stack. Photo by the author.

I haven’t posted in a while on my 75g Tanganyikan community tank, so thought I would give an update. The tank currently houses the following:

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A pugnacious little fish

Throughout my fish keeping journey over the past two decades, I have kept many species of cichlids. We know that every cichlid has its own personality. We also know that the size of the fish is not indicative of its aggression level (e.g., not all big fish are mean and not all little fish are friendly). In fact, some of the nastiest species I’ve kept are dwarf species. 

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Dr. Alan DeAngelo interview

Dr. Alan DeAngelo
 
Today’s interviewee is one of those cichlid keepers who’s forgotten more about cichlids than most of us will ever know. How many of you bought your first aquarium at 6 years old? If you did, are you still going strong in the hobby after more than 50 years? How many of you helped your dad build a 130g aquarium using stainless steel, especially one that has lasted over 50 years (albeit resealed a few times), which has seen countless offspring from tropheus, discus, convicts, mbuna, and more?

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